3 Powerful Beliefs that all Great Leaders Must Develop

leadership beliefsThere are leaders that we eagerly follow, hang on their every word and come to them looking for guidance. Then there are bosses. You know – the annoying, close-minded, stubborn control freaks that everyone dislikes and complains about?

Taken out of context they could be wonderful people, loving husbands or wives, devoted fathers or mothers, and passionate golf-players.

But…

When it comes to leading, organizing and empowering people, bosses’ social status by far exceeds their leadership abilities.

Fortunately for us (and for the bosses) there is hope, because with the right guidance and dedication leadership skills can be developed and improved.

  • So how do you take a mediocre boss and transform them into a Charismatic Leader?
  • What are the main qualities that define inborn leaders that attract loyal followers wherever they go?
  • What is the secret of their carefree success?

I found that at the base of any leadership success and charisma lay 3 Powerful Beliefs:

1. Leaders believe in what they do.

Why is it so important for a great leader to be passionate about their business, life philosophy or their idea? Can they not just manage their team and demand outstanding results?

Of course they can, but the problem is that people do not need to be managed, convinced or directed. They need to be inspired by the goal that is worth pursuing and then simply shown how to get there. Many successful companies like Google, Apple and Netflix have long realized this. Instead of using “carrot and stick” motivation to make their employees meet the monthly quota, they have created a vision and a company philosophy that is so powerful and appealing that there is no need to “supervise” or micromanage the team. People believe in their company and they genuinely enjoy working there.

2. Leaders believe in their team.

The biggest part of leadership success is built on personal trust. There should be no doubt in a leader’s mind that their team members are incapable of accomplishing something. Great leaders believe that people will do well if you show them how to do it. Unfortunately, when it comes to real life examples, managers who are supposed to lead their team often do not trust their employees enough to give them sufficient freedom or room for mistakes.

Why is micromanaging and lack of trust so damaging for business? Simply because people can not and will not perform to their fullest unless they are respected and trusted.

Think about it this way – every day we place our trust in the hands of people we do not even know, like bank managers to handle our funds, dentists to keep our teeth healthy, or bus drivers to take us safely from point A to point B. We rely on them because we believe that they know what they are doing. Yet when it comes to our team members we prefer to double-check and micromanage.

I know that you might think you can do certain things better, faster and more correctly (which might be true), but unless you learn to trust others and leave them some space to grow and improve, you will end up spending most of your time doing tasks that are way below your qualification.

3. Leaders believe in themselves.

In any work area there will be situations that will require a leader to take risks and be ready to assume full responsibility in case something goes wrong. It is pretty simple actually – a company’s biggest successes are always a merit to great teamwork, while a company’s failures are mostly a direct result of poor judgment calls on the part of the leader. If you want to be a great leader, you should be prepared that at times of crisis and worry; people will turn to you for confidence and for the solutions to problems.

If you do not think you will be able to handle all this responsibility, it is time to start building your self-esteem and self-confidence starting now. (Here are some tips that can help you to do this.)

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  • http://lookingtobusiness.com Daniel Wood

    “Leaders believe in their team.”

    Most of the poor leaders e.g. bosses have lacked in this area, they can be extremely talented, smart but they do not trust anyone else and therefore we do not trust them.

    • Arina

      Thank you, Daniel, for your feedback. Again, it’s dead on.

  • Tfenner67

    These are 3 important pearls of wisdom regarding leadership. What I have found is that we have to understand that in order to become a great leader in our area is believe in the whole team: decision makers, strategists and action do’ers. These components also lead the team. 

    • Arina

      It is an interesting point, Tfenner67. In every business you have to have people, who make decisions about the course of the company, people who do the strategic planning, and those who take actual steps to meet company’s goals. If you think about it, those are the three main components of any Goal Setting process. 

      Thanks for your sharing.

  • Craig

    My favorite belief is number 2, “Leaders believe in their team.”  I’ve seen leaders (myself included) often project doubts upon the team they are in charge of inspiring.  The level of conviction in the belief that the team is capable is without question key.  Thanks for sharing.  

    http://www.craigvillarrubia.com

    • Arina

      Belief number 2 is my favorite as well. You are right –  you simply can not inspire or lead people when in the back of your mind you think they might fail. 

  • Ssebatta Gerald

    The success of great institutions and company does not lie in having great individuals because individuals will always come and go but it lies in having strong systems and policies. Great leaders will always inspire and empower their teams.
    Number two works greatly for me.

    Ssebatta Gerald